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Whiting Brothers, Yucca, AZ

Brief history:

Yucca Bypass

Even when Route 66 was first built in the 1920s, several supporters worked to have the highway parallel the railroad through Yucca, where its supporters lived. However, Oatman was at its peak as a mining community and had more clout. So, even though it made the drive more difficult on those old Model-Tís, the original route took the hazardous journey up Sitgreaves Pass, bypassing Yucca .

In the end it all came back around, when in 1952, Route 66 was straightened out and headed through Yucca , this time bypassing Oatman.

As you travel this newer alignment to Yucca, elevations begin to drop as you get your first glimpses of the dreaded Mojave Desert.

At this old Whiting Brothers complex, there's no more gas, no more groceries, and no more beds.

Yucca thried through the 1950s as tourist courts and cafes sprouted up. When I-40 replaced Route 66 through here, Yucca exits remained, but it wasnít enough to keep the old services open. Soon, one more of the many Whiting Brothers Complexes "bit the dust." All that remains today are its famous signs. Other businesses followed suit, leaving Yucca with little more than abandoned businesses, mobile homes, and an odd golf-ball looking house.

Beyond Yucca , there is little to see along the steaming desert highway other than dozens of large billboards enticing you to visit Lake Havasu to the South. Settle in for the next 25 mile stretch until you reach the wide Colorado River at Topock.


http://www.legendsofamerica.com/AZ-KingmanToCalifornia.html

If you go to this link you will find a pic very much like one of those I took today.

The property consists of a cafe and motel. The motel has 8 units and a motel office; I took pics of the office and all the units, plus the cafe. The friends I was with said they knew why I wanted the photo op, but they didn't expect me to be CSI (I examined everything). One friend thought it was particularly funny that I shot the No Trespassing sign and then proceeded on.

Now for the pics:

To contact Abandoned But Not Forgotten please e-mail us at abnfco@gmail.com with any questions or submissions you may want to contribute to the site.

I DON'T GIVE OUT LOCATIONS.  I DON'T KNOW IF THE BUILDINGS ARE FOR SALE.  I DON'T KNOW IF THE BUILDINGS ARE STILL STANDING.





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